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Forschung, Veranstaltungen, Publikationen

Call for papers: “Nationalism from Below: Popular Responses to Nation-Building Projects in Bessarabia, Transnistria, Moldova”

Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS) (in partnership with Plural Forum for Interdisciplinary Studies, Republic of Moldova)
Dates: October 1-2, 2021
Location
: “Hybrid” - IOS Regensburg and ZOOM
Call for papers
Submission deadline: July 1, 2021.

Call for papers: The economics of populism: Drivers and consequences

13th Joint IOS/APB/EACES Summer Academy on Central and Eastern Europe.
Dates: July 5–7, 2021
Location: Tutzing, Lake Starnberg, Germany. Should the pandemic prohibit an offline meeting, the event will be organized in an online or mixed format.
Call for papers
Submission deadline: April 30, 2021.

Seminarreihe des Arbeitsbereichs Ökonomie am IOS

Zeit: Dienstag, 15:00–16.30 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS); vorerst online via Zoom, Anmeldung.
Programm

Forschungslabor: „Geschichte und Sozialanthropologie Südost‐ und Osteuropas“

Zeit: Donnerstag, 14–16 Uhr (Lehrstuhl) oder 16–18 Uhr (Graduiertenschule und Leibniz-WissenschaftsCampus)
Ort: per Zoom
Programm

Ringvorlesungen CITAS: Area Studies und Raum vom Globalen Süden her neu denken

Sommersemester 2021
Zeit: donnerstags, 18:15-19:45
Ort: online via Zoom
Programm

Freie Stellen Text
Gastwiss. Programm Text
Leibniz

Aktuelles – Details

13. April 2021
Vorträge

Russians’ “Impressionable Years”: Life Experience during the Exit from Communism and Putin-Era Beliefs

Ein Vortrag von William Pyle (Middlebury College) im Rahmen der Seminarreihe des AB Ökonomie am IOS.
Datum: 13. April 2021
Zeit: 15.00 Uhr
Ort: Online via Zoom, Anmeldung

This article links Russians’ individual experiences during the late-Gorbachev and early-Yeltsin years to beliefs they espoused in the Putin era, over a decade later. Drawing on the 2006 wave of the Life in Transition Survey, I show that a range of attitudes – including diminished support for markets and democracy and stronger support for reducing inequality – can be explained by whether an individual suffered labor market hardships in the half decade from 1989 to 1994. Subsequent labor market disruptions, surprisingly, bear no such relationship to beliefs in 2006. Relative to the rest of the former Soviet Union, this pattern is unique. Though an explanation is difficult to pin down, one speculative hypothesis is that for Russians, individual economic hardship, in conjunction with the dissolution of the Soviet Union, may have been particularly disorienting. Life experiences during those years of instability, uncertainty, and diminished status may have left a uniquely enduring impression.