IOS-NEWSLETTER 
Forschung, Veranstaltungen, Publikationen

The economics of populism: Drivers and consequences

13th Joint IOS/APB/EACES Summer Academy on Central and Eastern Europe.
Dates: July 5–7, 2021
Location: Tutzing, Lake Starnberg, Germany. As the pandemic prohibits an offline meeting, the event will be organized in an online format (Zoom).
Program

Call for papers: “Nationalism from Below: Popular Responses to Nation-Building Projects in Bessarabia, Transnistria, Moldova”

Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS) (in partnership with Plural Forum for Interdisciplinary Studies, Republic of Moldova)
Dates: October 1-2, 2021
Location
: “Hybrid” - IOS Regensburg and ZOOM
Call for papers
Submission deadline: July 1, 2021.

Seminarreihe des Arbeitsbereichs Ökonomie am IOS

Zeit: Dienstag, 15:00–16.30 Uhr
Ort: Leibniz-Institut für Ost-und Südosteuropaforschung (IOS); vorerst online via Zoom, Anmeldung.
Programm

Forschungslabor: „Geschichte und Sozialanthropologie Südost‐ und Osteuropas“

Zeit: Donnerstag, 14–16 Uhr (Lehrstuhl) oder 16–18 Uhr (Graduiertenschule und Leibniz-WissenschaftsCampus)
Ort: per Zoom
Programm

Ringvorlesungen CITAS: Area Studies und Raum vom Globalen Süden her neu denken

Sommersemester 2021
Zeit: donnerstags, 18:15-19:45
Ort: online via Zoom
Programm

Freie Stellen Text
Gastwiss. Programm Text
Leibniz

Aktuelles – Details

15. Juni 2021
Vorträge

Firms, Kinship and Economic Growth in the Kyrgyz Republic

Ein Vortrag von Theodore P. Gerber (University of Wisconsin-Madison) im Rahmen der Seminarreihe des AB Ökonomie am IOS.
Datum: Dienstag, 15. Juni 2021
Zeit: 16.00 Uhr!
Ort: Online via Zoom, Anmeldung

The paper addresses whether kinship networks promote or impede entrepreneurship in the Kyrgyz Republic. We conducted a survey of firm managers/entrepreneurs about their business networks, resources they receive from and provide to their contacts, their firm's performance, and the business environment they face. Our data indicate that receiving help from kin connections increases profitability, while providing help to kin decreases it. While kin-reliant firms grow slower than firms with a lower degree of kin assistance, the former grow faster than firms that do not have access to business networks. In addition, kin connections and firm performance are unrelated for firms that have adopted best business practices. Our results demonstrate that directly measuring both receipt and provision of help from/to kin helps resolve the ambiguity of findings in the broader literature regarding the net effects of kin networks on firm performance: the two forms of network use are positively correlated, yet have opposite effects.